Kattuggla4xIMG_2295LNw.jpgPhoto: Lars Nyberg.Grafiskt element

Tawny Owl

Strix aluco

The tawny owl is the Royal National City Park’s most typical owl. In February the first territorial calls can be heard from its favourite nesting trees in the park, usually an oak. Its call comprises a quavering hoot from the male, often answered by a typical ‘to-wit’ from the female. In August there is usually quite a commotion from the owl woods when the young birds are expelled from the territory to an uncertain future of self-maintenance. As a result, many young tawny owls die in their first year. Besides starvation, the park’s eagle owls, goshawks and foxes also present a threat. The tawny owl is a sedentary bird and does not fly long distances; instead it seeks the nearest suitable empty territory. It is likely that most of the expelled juveniles try to find territories within the park in the first place.

 


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